This is just the beginning.

I woke up at my usual time this morning, a little after 6:30am, and my daily routine picked up where I last left it on Tuesday. I poured myself a steaming mug of coffee, opened a sachet of wet food for the cat and settled down in front of the TV whilst scrolling through my tweets. But today didn’t feel quite the same as it usually does.

I felt guilty.

You see, on Wednesday 14 June my routine took a slight deviation. I, like many others, took part in #ukhousingfast. We forfeited our meals for the day and made a pledge to donate money, raise awareness and gather items for our local food banks, a service which so many families (too many), rely upon.

HF tweet

 

We stood united. An army of housing people posting messages of support and sentiment throughout the day.

We achieved some amazing things that day; our tweets reached over 178,000 people; we smashed our £1000 fundraising total, and; hundreds of items made their way to local food banks, specifically those run by the amazing Trussell Trust.

UKhousingfast analytics cropped

Huge thanks to Asif Choudry for providing the stats

 

But my guilt remained. It was far too easy for me to get up at 4am and scoff some porridge and banana to help get me through the day. Far too easy to call at my local chippy to feast when the clock struck 10pm and the sun settled down for the day. To go to bed that evening, get a good night’s sleep then wake up the next day smoothly easing myself back into my normal routine just felt wrong.

What I’d experienced for one day is sadly the norm for so many, day in, day out. Food poverty doesn’t just affect those who find themselves homeless, some of them are fortunate enough to have a roof over their heads, they may even have work to go to, but they come home, they’ve paid their bills and they then search the cupboards with nothing but a void space staring back at them. These people are our customers, our tenants, our neighbours, our friends, our family.

I spent 14 June trying not to think about food. 1000s of people in the UK cannot think of nothing else but food.

Food banks are an essential service which is relied upon too often and this has got to stop. Evie Copland nailed it with this tweet:

EC tweet

 

My guilt is slowly easing knowing the good work we have all done; seeing the coming together of people who have shown endless generosity and kindness for others in need has been wonderful.

Donations

Donations made by my awesome Bromford colleagues

 

We have made a difference, so thank you, each and every one of you, but don’t be fooled into thinking this is the end.

Let’s make a stand, let’s make a change, for this is just the begninning.

 

Why, Daniel Blake?

 

why-daniel-blake-header-v3

Finally, I watched I, Daniel Blake last night.

I missed all the hysteria and controversy that surrounded Cathy Come Home 50 years ago, so I made a point of watching Ken Loach’s latest offering at my first opportunity.

I’m not going to lie to you, I sobbed. The tears rolled down as the end credits made their way up.

I reflected on the story thinking:

Why is UK housing in such a mess?

Why is our benefits system so baffling?

Why are parents having to skip food for themselves just so that they can feed their children?

Why do we see technology as the answer when being human is the human being connection?

Why, just why?

As I woke the following morning, the central heating kicked in, I flicked on the landing light and made my way down the stairs to boil the kettle and prepare breakfast. I couldn’t wait to see my daughter; to tell her that I love her and to cuddle her into next week!

Sadly, these things I sometimes take for granted are an everyday struggle for many families up and down the country.

I, Daniel Blake awakens your senses to this.

It’s a sobering realisation of the failing benefits system and the struggles within social housing.

Ken Loach, I salute you.

Please, watch this film and share its message.

A message to my younger self

shutterstock_475291216

Dear Andy (aged 24years, 5months),

 

I know you’re only a few weeks into your new job, and the archaic computer system you’re using with the black screen, green text and ‘tab’ navigation is a little cruddy; but trust me, this will get better.

 

The repairs call centre that you’re working in; you see it as just a ‘stepping stone’ to bigger and better things. But listen, today the customer service centre (as it’s now called) handles a multitude of queries – everything from rents to repairs, home moves to house shares, they’re even handling social media queries and talking to customers whilst they’re watching Bake Off on a Wednesday evening. My apologies, Bake Off doesn’t even exist yet does it, let alone Twitter and Facebook!

 

I hear your cries about the training events you keep being sent on; classroom event after classroom event. You’ll love what we have now. That earlier point about computers; those have been replaced by colour screens, they’re super-fast and can even go wireless…and all that classroom training you’ve got coming up; all that can fit into these tiny little devices no bigger than your notepad! You’ll be able to access all that resource material, all that expert knowledge and all you’re learning records in just a few clicks of a button.

 

I know you don’t have the time to spend all day talking to them, you have queues from others trying to get through. I appreciate you don’t have the website we have where customers can watch ‘how to videos’ and report repairs online, nor do you have engineers going out to do regular service checks on our homes like we do now – all of which can help reduce those large volumes of calls; but every one of our customers have their own story, they just need to be heard.

 

That’s why we’re changing the way we’re working. We believe that establishing the right kind of relationship with every customer can help them get the best from their home, our services and their communities – so we’re introducing neighbourhood coaches. They have smaller patches to work with, around 175 customers each, a far cry from the 500+ they had back then ‘eh?! This means they can get closer to those customers who most need it, dedicate more time to them and help them to do more for themselves; manage their money, their relationships, get into work or college.

 

So, think twice about looking elsewhere. That call centre (as you know it) has some exciting changes ahead. Bromford is going to evolve and create some fantastic opportunities for its customers and colleagues.

 

Be brave and stick with it. Make a difference and add a bit of you. But remember; there is no spoon. Don’t worry, that’ll all make sense when you join me here in 2016!

 

All the best, Andy.

 

from,

Andy (aged 37years, 4months)

Engagement Specialist at Bromford

 

P.S. Being a Dad is awesome!

Business lessons from a toddler!

Last Thursday I had the absolute pleasure of being part of Bromford’s final Future Fifty event with guest speaker, CEO and founder of Ella’s Kitchen; Paul Lindley.

The day was the finale in a series of events that we hosted and it marked the anniversary of Bromford’s first ever Board Meeting in November 1963. In reflection of this we brought together old friends, colleagues and board members to hear from Paul, our CEO Mick Kent, see the launch of our YouCan Foundation and listen to some inspirational stories from a couple of Bromford’s customers.

Paul seized his opportunity to reflect on the significant milestones of the past 50 years and talked us through what he felt had changed, and hadn’t, during this time. You can watch the live-stream of the event again through our YouTube channel. But one of the highlights for me came in the second part of Paul’s presentation where he talked about the future of entrepreneurship and leadership. This was it for me, this is the thing that hooked my smile and I think caught everyone’s imagination around the room.

Is it the childlike behaviour or the Superman baby-grow that does it?

Is it the childlike behaviour or the Superman baby-grow that does it?

So here are Paul’s 6 business lessons from a toddler (with a few descriptions from me):

Never give up
How many times have you said to your children, or heard others say to theirs, to stop doing something – yet the little ones continue in their quest to do as they originally intended. Nothing will get in their way! For me, the determination of these little humans is unparalleled.

Be creative
Just this weekend I took delivery of a few Christmas presents that I’d purchased from an online book store. When my daughter copped her eyes on the said box her immediate reaction was; “Daddy a robot”. No, she hadn’t gone mad. She’d seen the cardboard surround as much more than just a box, she wanted me to turn it into a robot suit that she could wear. Don’t you just love that creative spirit?!

“Be childlike not childish in your work; have fun and be creative” ~ @Paul_Lindley

Get noticed
Kids are the life and soul of pretty much every family gathering. They stand out in every supermarket, are the main reason we make so much of Christmas and you’re likely to hear them before you’ve even seen them! Kids quite simply like to get noticed – no different from all aspiring colleagues and businesses I guess.

Be honest
Sometimes we don’t like to hear the truth, but if we’re not prepared to listen how can we possibly learn and move forward? Similarly we need to be honest with others, if they ask for feedback, are looking for advice or want your opinion – tell them what you really think. Toddlers have to be some of the most honest people you’ll ever know – they’ll tell you how it really is.

Show your feelings
Much like the honesty point above, it’s not often we will say to others how we really feel – but we should. We should open up more to other people, let them know if we’re feeling low and when we’re not ‘in the room’. A child is much the same, they will tell you when they’re hungry, when they are hurt and when they’re feeling poorly and could do with a hug – now, how good is a hug!

Use different strategies
Why do we continue to do the same things in the same ways time and time again? We tend to know what our objectives are and yet, despite our commitment to get the best result possible, continue to go about it in the same way we always have. Now, how often do we see children climb over things, go under things and around things that we say they shouldn’t? Is it really so wrong or should we just allow them to take on a new challenge just as we would want for ourselves and our customers?

“Some advice to new business: always, always be a toddler” ~ @Paul_Lindley

Being a parent to a 3 year old I totally get these points from Paul. So let’s cut through the waffle and the jargon and align our approach to business through the eyes of a toddler.

I’ve come up with a few extra of my own which I’ve turned into a Haiku Deck. What do you think? Are there any that you can think of that you’d like to add? Go on be honest, be creative, show your feelings and get yourself noticed!

Just to remind you that the recording of the live-stream from the event is available on our YouTube channel where you can see all of Paul’s presentation. You can also see the launch of our YouCan Foundation, hear from two of our customers whose lives have been touched by the work that we’ve done, and see an ‘interview in hashtags’ with our flamboyant leader; Mick Kent. You can also follow the tweets from the day in the two Storify’s we’ve put together here and here.

 

If you’re interested in reading more from Paul Lindley, his new book “Little Wins: The Huge Power of Thinking Like a Toddler” is available to order now from Amazon.

The Bromford DNA, Let It Be

This is my latest post that first appeared as a guest article over at All Things IC courtesy of Rachel Miller (thanks again Rachel). I hope you enjoy it.

*The Fab Four - can you name them?

*The Fab Four – can you name them?

I wonder how many of us could name The Beatles? My guess is that most would name the Fab 4 without breaking a sweat, right? Now, how many of us could reel off our company’s mission statement, vision and values without hesitation? Not so easy is it.

Anybody that follows me on twitter, reads my blog or knows me personally would have almost certainly heard me bang on about the company that I work with and how much I love it! Like The Beatles we’re celebrating our 50th anniversary here at Bromford and it’s been during this milestone that we’ve opted for a cleaner and more leaner approach of inspiring people to be their best.

We’ve ditched the tradition of a mission statement, a blurred vision and an exhaustive list of values. Instead we look for colleagues to work with us who share our newly launched DNA; Be Good, Be Brave, Be Different and Be Commercial, our very own awesome foursome!

Our very own 'Fab Four'

Our very own ‘Fab Four’

Just this week, 6 months since their launch, a number of leaders from across Bromford (including me) were presented with a challenge; to go and investigate our DNA and then feedback to a wider audience what we found. We were asked to visit other teams, see how colleagues are embracing ‘the Be’s’, look at how they are bringing them to life and to, well, Be Nosey!

The day arrived and we had our usual army of tweeters and yammerers (is that the right word, do we even have one yet? If not let’s invent one!), who were on hand to pledge their support and give real-time updates to those who couldn’t be in the room. We were treated to a great variety of presentations ranging from videos to Haiku Decks, a specially built website to a live recording of a podcast! The session was absolutely brilliant; not only did it showcase the wealth of talent we have across Bromford, it also gave us insight into our teams that may have only surfaced previously during lunch breaks and through team meetings.

So for me, someone who relishes a challenge and wanting to #BeBrave and #BeDifferent, I prepared my findings in a unique and inexpensive way. I presented back through our first ever Bromford comic book.

Our first Bromford comic has arrived.

Our first Bromford comic has arrived.

The comic’s content is taken from video screenshots of our HR team’s away day. What really stood out for me is the fun and engaging way in which colleagues were able to represent and demonstrate the respective Be’s from their team’s viewpoint. Inspirational lyrics, poems, amateur dramatics, avatars and future gazing – this team had it all, and don’t forget they were talking about something that had just replaced all that corporate jargon we used to have!

Now, how many of you reading this can honestly say that your mission statement, vision or values truly enable your colleagues to bring them alive in this way? Will they still be circulating like the Beatles are now; 50 years since they formed? We certainly hope that our new approach will stand the test of time and who knows, we could still be talking about our DNA come our 1st century!

If you’re interested in hearing more about our DNA and the #BeNosey challenge, visit our website and keep checking back for updates as they are released.

*Credit for The Beatles image goes to artist Meredith Kresge. Prints are available to buy here.

United Leadership (part 2)

Following on from my first post, I now bring you United Leadership (part 2) which concludes the learning and lessons that I took away from that fantastic trip I made up to Old Trafford earlier this month.

As in the words of dance music guru Pete Tong; “weee continue…”

United in history

United in history

Remembering history

If I’m ever lucky enough to win the lottery I’d like to think that I will remain true to myself, remain grounded and not forget where I came from. Manchester United kind of echoes that. Wherever you walk around Old Trafford, whoever you speak to – they all talk of that defining moment. Sadly it wasn’t a lottery win or a multi-million pound investment that they talk of, nor was it that kung-fu kick. It was a much darker moment in history that still resonates throughout the ground today, 55 years after the event. The Munich air disaster claimed the lives of 23 people; 2 crew members, 8 players, 3 staff, 8 journalists, a travel agent and a fan (who was a close friend of the then manager; Matt Busby). But the tragedy, and those affected during the incident, will never be allowed to be forgotten. Plaques, clocks, pictures and flags decorate the ground – even today – as a mark of respect and constant reminder that there have been dark times at the club but they will, together, overcome them to once again shine brighter days over the club that they love.

How often do we do this in our organisations? How often do we reflect on colleagues of yesteryear – those who have contributed to the successes of today and give us a hope for tomorrow?

Celebrate your successes

Next time you watch Manchester United play look carefully at the players after they score a goal; you’ll notice that almost every single one of the team (exception to the goalkeeper here) celebrate together. The club want everyone to feel the success. And what I think is brilliant is that Manchester United instil this same sentiment throughout the club. Whenever they reach a cup final, at home or abroad, all of the 700 colleagues that work for the club are taken along – they do this because they want everyone to be a part of the experience and for the whole United family to celebrate success together. It’s what teamwork is all about here and makes for a great culture.

Fitting your culture

When Manchester United are looking to buy a new player they don’t just look at his goal scoring record and price tag, they look at the whole package that the player would bring with them; Where are they based? What is their family like? Who is part of their entourage? They are looking to see if their target man will fit into the culture and the environment at the club. Players come and players go. It’s not just about performances on the field, it’s every much about their performances off it too, so if an individual is being just that – not adopting the values of the club, the team or the bigger family, the likelihood is that they’ll soon be looking for another club to move onto.

United they believe!

United, they believe!

Watch the competition, carefully

Believe is a word that vibrates throughout Manchester United. They believe so much in success that they never know when they are beaten.

Picture the scene; it’s the 1999 Champions League final between Manchester United and Bayern Munich at the Nou Camp, Barcelona. United are losing 1-0 with 1 minute of normal time left to play. Sir Bobby Charlton and Franz Beckenbauer are behind the scenes watching the game draw to a close and Beckenbauer is seen decorating the prestigious trophy with ribbons in his team’s colours. Sir Bobby walks over and congratulates him on his team’s feat. They start to make their way down to the pitch via the passenger lift unaware of the drama that is unfolding beneath them. The two club legends come out to the news that Manchester United had done the impossible and scored two late goals and have claimed the title!

Pitch-side, United’s Assistant Manager; Steve McClaren, looked happy with the score at 1-1 and was happy for the club to defend the remainder of the game to play for extra time. Sir Alex on the other hand was not, he wanted his team to push for the second goal and win the match in normal time.

In the games leading up to the final Bayern Munich seemed to always substitute defender Lothar Matthaus on or around the 75th minute of play so, just before that, Sir Alex introduced a third striker to the game in the shape of Teddy Sheringham. When the eventual Matthaus substitution happened on 80 minutes the United manager knew this was his opportunity and switched one of his on-field strikers for a fresh player; Ole Gunnar Solskjaer. Manchester United won the game thanks to two goals scored by – you guessed it – Sheringham and Solskjaer! It goes to show that this result didn’t just happen, it happened with purpose. Sir Alex knew his opposition and believed in what his side could achieve.

Great leaders go the extra mile

When people speak from the heart, others believe in them. If you see it matters to them, it will matter to you. It’s what makes Sir Alex a great leader.

A Man City fan, who was training to be a football coach, wrote a letter to Sir Alex asking him a few questions in hope he could help him with his studies. Surely he wouldn’t reply to the fan of a rival team, would he? He certainly did, in style too. He responded by sending a video to the fan which was a recording of himself answering the questions posed in the letter! Receiving that video must have been so much more powerful than just a few written words, it showed that Sir Alex cared because it was a subject close to his heart and demonstrated that we’re all leaders – inside and outside of our immediate teams – great leadership is about going the extra mile for others.

Surround yourself with great people and invest in them

Great leaders facilitate rather than do, you can’t do everything yourself. It’s about building trust with your people. Winning trophies didn’t just happen for Sir Alex, the manager learnt to be competent in the roles he wasn’t because he surrounded himself with good people who excelled in those areas. As a result he became a better leader and a better person, and the stories of success followed shortly after.

But to build that trust element you have to let your people know that you know them. Great leaders make people feel important. They invest in them, not just financially but emotionally too – it shows that they care.

David Gill (CEO of Manchester United) was leaving Old Trafford one Friday evening and was saying goodnight to each colleague as he passed them. The last person he saw was one of the ladies at the reception desk; he addressed her by name, exchanged pleasantries and then made his way to his car. It then dawned on him that he’d made a terrible mistake. That lady he’d just spoken to in reception was not the person he thought she was – he’d gotten her name wrong!

He quickly made his way back into the foyer and with the upmost sincerity apologised for his wrong-doing and stood chatting for a couple of minutes asking how she was and what she had planned for that weekend.

David Gill didn’t need to do what he did but he chose to, knowing that in doing so he could quickly turn the situation on its head. That lady on the reception desk has never forgotten this moment and will now do anything for Mr Gill and his guests. She is one of the first people that visitors see when coming into this section of Old Trafford – so will ensure that she gives a warm welcome and a lasting impression to all who she sees.

As leaders we don’t always get it right first time but we can make a positive difference with even the smallest amount of investment.

Is that Paul Scholes or Andy Johnson?!

Paul Scholes or Andy Johnson?!?

Recognise people’s differences and how to get the best out of them

People have their differences, even at Manchester United there are personal altercations between people. We were told of two key players who didn’t see eye-to-eye off the field, but on it, it never affected their game. In fact I never noticed it in the times I’d watched them play together. They came to work to do a job, and to do their job to the best of their ability. In work you have to respect that and understand how you can get the best out of your people. What is it that motivates them? Are they motivated toward or away from something? There’s a difference. Ryan Giggs was motivated toward achieving something – for him it was about getting fitter and faster, so the coaches worked with him to develop him on these areas. When Nemanja Vidic joined the club he was motivated away from being rubbish – he was/is one hell of a defender but he couldn’t pass the ball for toffee! So, the coaches had to tell him how bad he was at passing to help him to get better.

Rest more…often

The final story I’d like to share with you is one that is often shared around the club; it’s about two lumberjacks that challenge each other to a dual. One is a big strong burly fella and the other resembles more of an average figure – not quite so strong. The challenge is to see who can fell the most trees during an 8 hour session.

The big guy is straight to it, sawing into the trees relentlessly from the word go up until the siren sounds as the 8th hour is signalled. The smaller guy works his way through the trees but on the hour, at every hour, he takes himself off for a 5 minute break.

When the siren blows the felled trees are counted and we learn that the smaller of the two has won the friendly competition. The big guy cannot believe it. He is much stronger and worked straight through whilst his opponent rested – surely this cannot be so. The smaller guy explains that by taking regular breaks he was able to rest and re-focus on the job in-hand. Not only this but he was able to sharpen his saw, making sure his equipment was best prepared for the next gruelling session.

The ability to relax is a skill, a very effective one. If we want to set-out to achieve amazing things we must make sure we rest and recoup. Manchester United are no different – they have a 25 man squad for a reason and use it to ensure they rotate their players and give respite to all in the team

United in our learning

So, what have I learnt from Manchester United that we can take away into our own working lives? Successful teams and leadership goes way beyond the starting XI; it’s about the preparation, the coaching, the understanding of others and your surroundings. You need to learn from your mistakes but not dwell on them, create a positive environment in which to work and with people you can trust who are great at what they do. Surround yourself with good people who are willing to go the extra mile, who get your culture and want to celebrate as you do. It’s about remembering where you came from, knowing where you’re going and making sure that, now and again, you take the time to sharpen you saw!

HUGE thanks for reading and sticking around for part 2, and special thanks to HouseMark and John Shiels for a fantastic day.

United Leadership (part 1)

“Innnn West Midlands Wolves, born and raised, in a playground is where I spent most of my days…”

OK, it doesn’t have the same impact as the opening theme tune to the Fresh Prince of Bel Air but having seen Will Smith bring the song alive again on Graham Norton recently people like me, who grew up watching the exploits of Will and Carlton, couldn’t hide the goose bumps and feel good factor whilst watching it.

The same has to be said for football fans watching Manchester United dominate the English game, and for a short period Europe too, over the past 20 years or so. And it’s in no small thanks to the living legend that is Sir Alex Ferguson that the Red Devils rode this successful train for so many years.

On the 6th June 2013 I rode a short train journey of my own, from Wolverhampton up to Manchester, to attend a brilliant session organised by HouseMark and facilitated by the Manchester United Foundation on what it takes to build a high performance team through teamwork and leadership.

John Shiels delivered the session, CEO of the Foundation, who has worked with Manchester United for the past 7 years – so it’s fair to say this guy has some first hand experience of this club and what it takes to taste this success and, just as importantly, to maintain it.

You don’t need me to tell you just how big Manchester United are. With an annual turnover of over £330million they are more than just a football club, they are a brand – a very large brand – but one with a very expensive shop window. So to survive they need owners who do not throw money at it – their finances needs to be properly invested. They do things on purpose – not by accident. Some of the new kids on the block throw money at the shop window, but that doesn’t guarantee them longevity. It’s not just about today or tomorrow, it’s about building the foundations for a successful future.

This wasn’t a one-on-one session by the way, I went along with my colleague Josie and we represented Bromford in a room of 20 or so other Housing professionals. So, why would we be interested in what a football club has to say? Well, there are some significant leadership examples for us all here, applicable across many businesses, not just football or housing. There’s a lot to fit in, lots of stories to tell, so I’ll share some of the highlights of the day with you in two parts. This is part one.

Think BIG

To succeed in business your vision has to be big – mediocre is not good enough. When he joined the club as manager 26 years ago, Sir Alex wanted to beat the 18 league titles that Liverpool Football Club had won – it seemed an impossible task at the time but having recently stepped down from the helm he leaves the role with the club having won 20 league titles – when he joined Manchester United they’d only won 7!

Sir Alex Ferguson Stand

Have a shared vision

To continue in these successes, like any other business, there has to be succession planning at United. So, who have they brought in as Sir Alex’s successor – a manager with a track record for winning trophies, right? Wrong. They’ve appointed their new manager (David Moyes) because he had remained consistent throughout his last post at Everton (12 years as manager), had kept them in the top flight of football during his time and built a very good team and structure within a club who had very little investment in the transfer market (Manchester United spent £48m in 2012/13) and City (£76m in 2011/12). So, United have reflected their faith in him with a 6 year contract – a long time in football terms – because it’s all about creating stability and having a shared vision to build success.

Never stop learning

When you look at today’s top footballers, most of whom are multi-millionaires, how do you keep them focused when money is not a driver? It’s about knowing the individual’s needs and working with them to achieve their goals. John told us a story about Ryan Giggs – for those of you who don’t know him he’s the most decorated player in English football of all time (and still playing at the top level at the ripe old-age of 39). The club were looking for a volunteer to help out on a training session with some young kids one afternoon, and when the first team were asked that morning who could be available Ryan was the first to raise his hand, although he did explain that he couldn’t make it for the 1pm start as he had a prior engagement. When he did arrive shortly after 1.30pm the coach asked why he was late. Ryan explained that he was taking swimming lessons! Despite being a tuned athlete, fit as a fiddle, and still performing at the highest level Ryan wanted to do more, but it didn’t stop there. Ryan is learning to swim as he’s training to become a triathlete, amazing! If you want to be the best you’ve got to keep pushing yourself.

Create a positive environment

We often hear stories of how United bounce back in games where defeat seems to be staring them straight in the face. During the 2012/13 season there were 14 times where United came from behind to win the game, but they can’t always be victorious. John told us how, after seeing United lose one particular game, he got to see them warming down shortly after. Some players were seen laughing and joking – which he couldn’t understand. Why was this? Because they need to be focused on the next game; they had quickly put the loss behind them and were now preparing themselves physically and mentally for the next challenge. John said:

“Manchester United are better at losing than winning!”

Performance is key; get the performance right and the right result will follow.

Sir Alex rant

Communicate effectively

Some of you reading this may already be familiar with the model that effective communication is:

7% words

38% tone

55% body language

The power of body language is emphasised in this great story: United were having a bad day and weren’t playing particularly well in one of their home games. So, at half-time the manager came out first – before all the players – something he doesn’t normally do. He went over to the loudest section of fans (the Stretford end) and worked up the crowd by throwing his hands into the air and applauding them – he’s now got their attention. With the entire crowd watching him he now walks to the linesmen and follows them onto the pitch. He makes his way towards the referee to have a word with him, pointing his finger and looking typically animated. Nobody knows what is said but through his body language has communicated to 76,000 fans that there could be a problem and that “we need to do something here”. The second-half began shortly after; the fans got behind the team in rip-roaring fashion and united went on to win the game. Enough said – or in this case – hardly anything at all!

Learn from mistakes

Experience is about learning from the mistakes that have gone before, Manchester United are no different.

Great people like to be challenged, and that’s exactly what happened in the close season of 2011/12. Manchester United had just won their final game 1-0 meaning that Manchester City had to win their game to clinch the title; 27 seconds after United’s game finished City scored to win 2-1 and claimed the title. The following day was United’s player of the year awards and the body language around the room said it all. Sir Alex stood up to addresses the room saying something along the lines of:

“That was yesterday, we’re Manchester United and we will learn from that – I’ll go away and sharpen my saw and we’ll come back and win.”

Sir Bobby and Bryan Robson addressed the room too and said some similar things to that of the manager – all of a sudden the mood in the room was transformed. The United culture instilled. The following season United went on to romp the title beating their City rivals by an 11 point margin. Inspired by the top and believed in from the bottom.

I hope you enjoyed part 1. Keep checking back, or enter your email address at the top of the page, to hear more stories in part 2 and what Sir Alex meant by ‘sharpening his saw’.

*Part 2 is now available by clicking here